Escalating inequalities threaten social cohesion and put the future of democratic societies at risk. Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity aim to understand the complex causes, nature and consequences of inequalities and develop solutions for some of the most pressing issues of our time.

The underlying causes are wide-ranging and global, involving economic, social, cultural and political processes and class, gender, racial, ethnic, generational, and age divisions.

Atlantic Fellows are the next generation of practitioners and thinkers addressing the global challenge of inequalities.


PROGRAM

Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity. Photo: Neil Johnson

Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity. Photo: Neil Johnson

All fellowships are fully funded, tailored to meet the time or financial needs of experienced professionals. There are 3 main fellowship tracks.

TRACK 1: RESIDENTIAL FELLOWS

  • 10 Residential Fellows on the 12-month MSc Inequalities and Social Science course at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

TRACK 2: NON-RESIDENTIAL FELLOWS

  • 10 Non-Residential Fellows on 12- to 18- month program, with 7 weeks of workshops and field visits, including a one-week course at the University of Cape Town

TRACK 3: Visiting Fellows

  • 10 Visiting Fellows each year, working in teams of 3 to 4 for a number of months, to conduct intensive research and develop practical responses

Opportunities for continued community, collaboration and access to resources to support Fellows and their work

Program staff based at LSE International Inequalities Institute.


The diffusion of knowledge and education have always been key forces pushing towards the reduction in inequality; the Atlantic Fellows program offers a bold and exciting paradigm through which future changemakers can be equipped with the necessary insights and tools to chart a new way forward.
— THOMAS PIKETTY, EHESS and ECOLE D'ECONOMIE DE PARIS/PARIS SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS

Based at

 

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH



Banner photo: Johnny Miller, Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity